Compassion fatigue is a specific concept that can involve emotional, physical, and spiritual difficulties in individuals giving care to another. It has a connection with caregiving, where individuals and even animals face substantial emotional or physical discomfort and suffering.

Compassion fatigue is an array of symptoms, not an illness.


Compassion fatigue and its connection to secondary traumatic stress, PTSD, and empathic distress can produce problems in our lives. Delivering genuine, balanced self-care every day can help control and minimize the problematic issues related to compassion fatigue.

The cause of compassion fatigue, in all probability, originated in the course of our formative years. Enduring a dysfunctional childhood promotes the creation of behaviors and patterns that can lead to elevated compassion fatigue levels in caregiving. Studies reveal that children who suffered Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) such as alcoholism, physical abuse, or mental abuse are in danger of experiencing further violent abuse, chronic health problems, low quality of life, and even premature death. When we are placed in the position of attending for others at an early age, we place others’ needs ahead of our own. Also, we grow up deficient of healthy personal limits, familiarize ourselves with an overdeveloped feeling of responsibility, and hold the unresolved distress inside.

While there is no specific, fail-safe solution to “remedy” compassion fatigue, genuine, balanced self-care can help control the symptoms. Studying and applying new life skills is additionally needed to come to be self-directed as countered to other-directed. Delivering viable daily self-care can assist and handle symptoms, including isolation, emotional eruptions, sorrow and indifference, constant physical illnesses, and recurrent nightmares or flashbacks.

You are not alone.

High levels of compassion fatigue can be handled with reliable approaches. Edie DeVilbiss, the founder of Shape Good Habits, has many resources that I found for caregivers employed in many professions. I have assisted clients with this, but Edie is one of my best resources.  Please feel free to contact her at https://shapegoodhabits.com/ if you would like more information.